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Wolfgang Tillmans continued…

Having being excited about Tillmans’ still life photos, I have done a little research. Above are some of his other still life photographs I have found online.

Wolfgang Tillmans is a German photographer based in Berlin. He works within a wide range of genres from portraiture to still life to landscapes. He was the first photographer and non-British artist to win the Turner-prize in 2000. First exhibited at age 20, in 1988. From then became well known for provocative pictures of youth culture. He has always had an attraction to objects and photographed still life but these were rarely in his early publications. However in in the mid-90s in refusal to be type-cast as a pop culture artist he retrieved and printed his early still life photographs. From there he explored this genre further, taking inspiration from traditional painters Zurbaran and Caravaggio. (www.metmuseum.org)

The photos are courtesy of the following websites:

melisaki.tumblr.com

cork-grips.com

liveauctioneers.com

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Wolfgang Tillmans: Still Life @ Tate Liverpool (2013)

I really liked these photos and I think they might be relevant for the upcoming still life project. To me they represent contemporary still life and again they provide a narrative of objects in a person’s day-to-day experience. I felt that these still life works contrasted from ‘normal’ still life in a way I found difficult to identify. Possibly they felt less ‘composed’ and included everyday objects presented in an everyday, nonchalant type of way. They felt like still life as log of daily activity. I liked the colour combinations – the white rose, peach coloured grape fruit and raspberries and darker fruits, and the orange in the second photo. I like the angle which the photos are taken – head on, which is very direct.

The piece reminded me that all the objects around me represent possible compositions, and that there can be beauty or aesthetic value in the most mundane objects around. I am really excited about Wolfgang Tillmans’ work, I am glad I visited the Tate and found out about him.